The Future Is Greener Than You Think

In my network, many share a similar obsession. We want to create desirable futures.

Now more than ever

Our planet needs

Your light to thrive

In my network, many share a similar obsession. We want to create desirable futures. While I'm listening to my Buena Vista Social Club playlist again, which always makes me feel like I'm on vacation. I want to talk about a greener future. Because it seems to me that this topic has been lost in the last months.

Discerning the truth. There is an information war going on right now that never before has been seen on such a large scale, corporations like Google and Youtube have heavily censored information coming from Doctors and experts. This creates a great deal of confusion and as Daniel Schmachtenberger coins it, this is a war on sensemaking. Covid-19 is showing us that when humanity is united in common cause, phenomenally rapid change is possible. None of the world’s problems are technically difficult to solve; they originate in human disagreement. In coherency, humanity’s creative powers are boundless. Many times we are looking for the most complex solutions, not the simplest one. For Consultants and more a complex solution is easier to sell, cause there is an information asymmetry. We are living with complex systems all the time, but that does not mean we need a complex solution for that. What we need is a solution that works, and if it does not work anymore, we need to change it. This is called the Linda effect, and with our Jungle Thinking Method, we also keep that in mind.

After years of recycling, carbon offsetting, and light bulb replacement, it is clear that individual action will never be an adequate response to the climate crisis. Climate change is a collective problem and it requires collective action. One of the key areas where this collective action must take place is in large-scale investments aimed at reducing our emissions on a large scale. That means metros, trams and light rail systems that are not only everywhere but affordable and perhaps even free of charge for everyone; energy-efficient, affordable housing along these transit routes; smart grids that transport renewable energy; and massive research efforts to ensure that we use the best possible methods.

The private sector is poorly placed to provide most of these services as they require large up-front investments and if they are to be truly accessible to all, some of them may not be profitable. They are, however, firmly in the public interest, which is why they should come from the public sector. Completely new infrastructure models are needed, which are long-term and interchangeable. It is not important how well thought these ideas are on paper are. But more important than they will work (remember the Linda Effect).

In addition to reversing the privatization trend in recent years, a serious response to the climate threat is to recover art that has been relentlessly denigrated in these decades of market fundamentalism: planning. A lot of planning. Industrial planning. Land-use planning. And not only on a national and international level. Every city and community in the world needs a plan for how to move away from fossil fuels, what we might call an "energy descent action plan". In those cities and communities that have taken this responsibility seriously, the process has opened up rare spaces for participatory democracy, with neighbors convening consultative meetings in town halls to exchange ideas on how to reorganize their communities to reduce emissions and strengthen resilience for tough times ahead. Sometimes I go so far and tell myself, we should continue everything like it is now for the next 10 years and came up with a plan and consequences for those who not stick to the plan. It will be about results and not about predictions.

Climate change demands other forms of planning as well, particularly for workers whose jobs will become obsolete as we wean ourselves off fossil fuels. A few “green jobs” training sessions aren’t enough. These workers need to know that real jobs will be waiting for them on the other side. We see the same shift currently for corporates who needs “Digital” Knowledge. That means bringing back the idea of planning our economies based on collective priorities rather than corporate profitability—giving laid-off employees of car plants and coal mines the tools and resources to get equally secure jobs making subway cars, installing wind turbines and cleaning up extraction sites, to cite just a few examples. Some of this will be in the private sector, some in the public realm, and some in cooperatives, with worker-run green co-ops serving as a possible model.

What I am looking for?

For the last few years, I am quite interested in the combination of Biology and Technology and found some companies within this field with so much power to change industries (if you know some investors let me know).

But what is Biomimicry?

Biomimicry is based on the idea that we can take inspiration from nature when solving problems in design and engineering. Humans use the biodiversity found in nature as a material, yet it is also a major source of information from which we can draw inspiration through biomimicry, providing models that can be replicated, especially in terms of transition and adaptation.

This need to reconcile the Technosphere, created by humans, with the biosphere, to which we belong, is one of the major challenges of our time. Although the human brain is very powerful and capable of remarkable inventions, we are fundamentally biological beings, who are a part of a biological ecosystem.

This reconciliation, in essence, requires that we converge our economic systems and activities with the great system of life on which our survival depends. In practical terms, this means focusing on two essential points of reference: climate change and the impact on biodiversity. Humans have always known how to adapt, but lessons can be learned from nature about crisis mitigation, with one example being how oceans and trees absorb carbon. Therefore, it is essential to establish a framework for skills and knowledge development, as well as for all of our interactions, which puts the oceans, the climate and biodiversity at its heart.

But for most of the projects I see this is a less watched topic. Unfortunately! Let us have a look at the EU.

So in the EU, we have got a plan?

Climate change and environmental degradation are an existential threat to Europe and the world. To overcome these challenges, Europe needs a new growth strategy that transforms the Union into a modern, resource-efficient and competitive economy where

  • there are no net emissions of greenhouse gases by 2050

  • economic growth is decoupled from resource use

  • no person and no place is left behind

The European Green Deal is our roadmap for making the EU's economy sustainable. This will

  • happen by turning climate and environmental challenges into opportunities across all policy areas

  • and making the transition just and inclusive for all.

The European Green Deal provides a roadmap with actions to

  • boost the efficient use of resources by moving to a clean, circular economy

  • restore biodiversity and cut pollution.

It outlines the investments needed and financing tools available and explains how to ensure a just and inclusive transition. But it is less focused on antifragile systems and truly change. It will. Build upon the same fragile operating system we already have. And if we are moving towards some problems, it will be hard to shift.

https://ec.europa.eu/info/files/annex-roadmap-and-key-actions_en

They are saint that the EU will also provide financial support and technical assistance to help people, businesses, and regions that are most affected by the move towards the green economy. This is called the Just Transition Mechanism and will help mobilize at least €100 billion over the period 2021-2027 in the most affected regions. Let us see how that will work.

If you are interested in more, you will find some more information here:

https://ec.europa.eu/info/strategy/priorities-2019-2024/european-green-deal/actions-being-taken-eu_en

Worth reading today:

How to cut CO2 by 65%?

https://www.endseurope.com/article/1684692/official-data-shows-eu-cut-co2-65-2030-say-environmentalists

Mental models help us understand the world better, something which is especially valuable during times of confusion, like a pandemic. Here’s how to apply mental models to gain a more accurate picture of reality and keep a cool head.

https://fs.blog/2020/05/pandemic/

Know your Domain — The Cynefin Framework

https://medium.com/10x-curiosity/know-your-domain-the-cynefin-framework-dc28648558f1

A very nice Podcast

-> https://greendreamer.com/

That´s it for today, btw for the German speakers. There is also a new Podcast Episode out.

https://anchor.fm/wegbereiter

best,

Malte

An Economy for wellbeing

When I think about wellbeing, it is maybe different from yours. And for once, I'm not gonna write about BioTech, Longevity, Health, or anything like that. Natural it is important to talk about it.

When I think about wellbeing, it is maybe different from yours. And for once, I'm not gonna write about BioTech, Longevity, Health, or anything like that. Natural it is important to talk about it. But in an economic context today it's about something else. The economy needn’t be a war; it can be a common good. To get there, we must retrieve our innate goodwill. We are sitting in the same boat, we have to move beyond GDP.

Wellbeing as important as economic growth, says Nicola Sturgeon

The common good is a conscious implementation of mutual altruism. Whether we are humans or in nature, we reward those who cooperate with others and punish those who defect. A Commons works in a similar way. We see resources slightly different, think about a piece of land or a forest

It is a common good, but we find ways to monetize them.

An important concept to understand is that we are living on a finite planet. I guess this is pretty clear, but we haven’t really understood that. The Commons isn’t a winner takes all economy, rather an all take the winners economy. That means shared ownership encourages shared responsibility, which in turn engenders a long term perspective on business practice and probably will prevent human extinction. Also relevant to mention is that nothing can be externalized to someone else, because everyone is part of the same trust, and we are drinking from the same fountain.

If your own actions harm other participants, companies, or systems, you undermine the integrity of the market itself. For those who are enchanted by the myth of capitalism, this can be difficult to understand. They are still stuck, thinking that the economy is a two-column book in which every loan is the burden of another. This zero-sum mentality is an artifact of the central monopoly currency. If money has to be borrowed from a single, private treasury and repaid with interest, then this sad, competing model of scarcity makes sense. I have to pay back more than I borrowed, so I have to get the extra money from someone else. That's the real premise of zero-sum. But an economy doesn't have to work that way.

The destructive power of this system and its financing can be seen in current events. In a previous article (on my blog), I discussed the creation of money. That once the pharaohs distributed credit and introduced accounting and bank-like systems. If we believe there is a shortage, there will always be a shortage. So we have to get away from this belief to engage in something new. That new is something, that we trust that there will be more in the future and not less.

Advocates of the commons seek to optimize the economy for human beings, rather than the other way around. In a system where we own something and create value from it, we create a system for everyone. Today, there are already numerous examples that are organized accordingly, Today, we might call such an arrangement a cooperative. In other words, workers should collectively own the tools and factories they use to create value. The same sorts of structures are being employed in digital businesses. As I have been dealing with complex systems all my life, we have to find a way to make platforms business models more cooperative. In New York, there is a movement by Trebor Schulz called Platform cooperatism (A hub that helps you start, grow, or convert to platform co-ops). I had the pleasure to speak with him several times and it was always a pleasure. In these “platform cooperatives,” participants own the platform they’re using, instead of working for a “platform monopoly” taxi app or giving away their life data to a social media app.

What they visioned is the following: In the face of widespread dissatisfaction with capitalism, it is time to ask, “What kind of new economy do we want to create?” Instead of optimizing the online economy for growth and short-term profits for the few, we need to optimize the digital economy for all the people in this universe.

Platform co-ops offer a near-future, alternative to platform capitalism based on cooperative principles such as democratic ownership and governance. Please have a look at their Website.

Another important point is, De-Growth or SlowGrowth to No Growth. As once requested by the Club of Rome. Nowadays to defined as a "post-growth economy”. For a future that's better, not bigger. Only the dismantling of the industrial model to a post-growth economy will enable socially stable and globally fair supply structures. By De-Growth or post-growth, I mean a way of doing business and a form of society that aims to promote the wellbeing of all and preserve the ecological foundations of life. This requires a fundamental change in the world in which we live and a comprehensive cultural change.

The current economic and social guiding principle is "higher, faster, further" - it requires and encourages competition between all people. On the one hand, this leads to acceleration, excessive demands, and exclusion. On the other hand, economic activity destroys our natural foundations of life and the habitats of plants and animals. We are convinced that the common values of a post-growth society should be mindfulness, solidarity, and cooperation. Humanity must see itself as part of the planetary ecosystem. Only in this way can a self-determined life in dignity for all be made possible.

Bigger isn’t necessarily better. Things in nature grow to a certain point and then stop. They become full-grown adults, forests, or coral reefs. This doesn’t mean they’re dead. If anything, it’s the stability of adulthood that lets them become participating members of larger, mutually supportive networks. We know that nothing in nature can sustain an exponential rate of growth, but this doesn’t stop many of our leading economists and scientists from perpetuating this myth. They cherry-pick evidence that supports the endless acceleration of our markets and our technologies as if to confirm that growth based corporate capitalism is keeping us on track for the next stage of human evolution. To suggest we slow down, think, consider—or content our- selves with steady profits and incremental progress—is to cast oneself as an enemy of our civilization’s necessary acceleration forward. By the market’s logic, human intervention in the machine will only prevent it from growing us out of our current mess. In this read of the situation, corporations may be using extractive, scorched-earth tactics, but they are also our last best hope of solving the world’s biggest problems, such as hunger and disease. Questioning the proliferation of patented, genetically modified seeds or an upgraded arsenal of pesticides just impedes the necessary progress. Adherents of this worldview say that it’s already too late to go back. There are already too many people, too much damage, and too much dependence on energy. The only way out is through. Regulating a market just slows it down, preventing it from reaching the necessary level of turbulence for the “invisible hand” to do its work.

When it comes to the possibilities of 'learning from history' there are doubtless many things we could aspire to learn. Some of those would be more practically useful, in terms of contributing to the normal and decent functioning of well-meaning societies than others.

"We learn from history that we learn nothing from history."

George Bernard Shaw

Overwhelmed with the current status quo, we came up with short term thinking solutions. We see technology arises, but don’t see the bigger picture. Especially when we talk to scientists or people like Ray Kurzweil, we hear how often prosperity improves every year. They measure improvement as a function of life expectancy or a reduction in the number of violent deaths. Those are great improvements on their own, but they give false cover for the crimes of modern capitalism—as if the relative peace and longevity enjoyed by some inhabitants of the West were proof of the superiority of its model and the unquestionable benefit of pursuing growth. Nevertheless, our society is becoming more and more divided and our well-being in the western world is steadily decreasing. Mr. Fuller already said 40 years ago how we can live in a society we would like to live in, if you are interested in that, message me. I don’t want to write a book here yet.

Statistically speaking, I do acknowledge the arguments, but they leave a lot to hide. We have modern slavery, toxic waste dumps, river pollution, and global geopolitical disputes, all of which depend on the same system. So while we calm ourselves down with statistics, and adjust them to our imagination, we live in a world that is increasingly falling apart. Many problems that lead to the extinction of mankind, we have not addressed, cyberwar, drone wars, killer bacteria, bioweapons, the eradication of other countries or the destruction of our Mother Earth.

Capitalism is not fair and it has not reduced violence, nor has it reduced many of the technologies that should now support us in our daily lives. We may get shot down less in the public streets, but that doesn't mean that the world has become any less violent or that the blind pursuit of permanent economic growth or technological progress has increased with the enhancement of human well-being. How are we going to tell a chief of a company or state that what he is doing is bad?

With the blessing of the economy, we will continue, rather than reinvent ourselves, to go on the self-destructive way for another 5-10 years. So we make promises that the world will be better, we just have to be more advanced than before.

In the calculation of capitalism, we often forget ourselves, the human being. And now, in this calculation, we strive to simply dissolve it, to automate it. We want to overcome every potential obstacle to drive economic and technological growth as smoothly as before.

But we need models that do not strive for more, but for the one that best adapts to the environment or in the words of Mr. Taleb an antifragile economy.

An Economy for wellbeing

When I think about wellbeing, it is maybe different from yours. And for once, I'm not gonna write about BioTech, Longevity, Health, or anything like that. Natural it is important to talk about it.

When I think about wellbeing, it is maybe different from yours. And for once, I'm not gonna write about BioTech, Longevity, Health, or anything like that. Natural it is important to talk about it. But in an economic context today it's about something else. The economy needn’t be a war; it can be a common good. To get there, we must retrieve our innate goodwill. We are sitting in the same boat, we have to move beyond GDP.

Wellbeing as important as economic growth, says Nicola Sturgeon

The common good is a conscious implementation of mutual altruism. Whether we are humans or in nature, we reward those who cooperate with others and punish those who defect. A Commons works in a similar way. We see resources slightly different, think about a piece of land or a forest

It is a common good, but we find ways to monetize them.

An important concept to understand is that we are living on a finite planet. I guess this is pretty clear, but we haven’t really understood that. The Commons isn’t a winner takes all economy, rather an all take the winners economy. That means shared ownership encourages shared responsibility, which in turn engenders a long term perspective on business practice and probably will prevent human extinction. Also relevant to mention is that nothing can be externalized to someone else, because everyone is part of the same trust, and we are drinking from the same fountain.

If your own actions harm other participants, companies, or systems, you undermine the integrity of the market itself. For those who are enchanted by the myth of capitalism, this can be difficult to understand. They are still stuck, thinking that the economy is a two-column book in which every loan is the burden of another. This zero-sum mentality is an artifact of the central monopoly currency. If money has to be borrowed from a single, private treasury and repaid with interest, then this sad, competing model of scarcity makes sense. I have to pay back more than I borrowed, so I have to get the extra money from someone else. That's the real premise of zero-sum. But an economy doesn't have to work that way.

The destructive power of this system and its financing can be seen in current events. In a previous article (on my blog), I discussed the creation of money. That once the pharaohs distributed credit and introduced accounting and bank-like systems. If we believe there is a shortage, there will always be a shortage. So we have to get away from this belief to engage in something new. That new is something, that we trust that there will be more in the future and not less.

Advocates of the commons seek to optimize the economy for human beings, rather than the other way around. In a system where we own something and create value from it, we create a system for everyone. Today, there are already numerous examples that are organized accordingly, Today, we might call such an arrangement a cooperative. In other words, workers should collectively own the tools and factories they use to create value. The same sorts of structures are being employed in digital businesses. As I have been dealing with complex systems all my life, we have to find a way to make platforms business models more cooperative. In New York, there is a movement by Trebor Schulz called Platform Cooporatism (A hub that helps you start, grow, or convert to platform co-ops). I had the pleasure to speak with him several times and it was always a pleasure. In these “platform cooperatives,” participants own the platform they’re using, instead of working for a “platform monopoly” taxi app or giving away their life data to a social media app.

What they visioned is the following: In the face of widespread dissatisfaction with capitalism, it is time to ask, “What kind of new economy do we want to create?” Instead of optimizing the online economy for growth and short-term profits for the few, we need to optimize the digital economy for all the people in this universe.

Platform co-ops offer a near-future, alternative to platform capitalism based on cooperative principles such as democratic ownership and governance. Please have a look at their Website.

Another important point is, De-Growth or SlowGrowth to No Growth. As once requested by the Club of Rome. Nowadays to defined as a "post-growth economy”. For a future that's better, not bigger. Only the dismantling of the industrial model to a post-growth economy will enable socially stable and globally fair supply structures. By De-Growth or post-growth, I mean a way of doing business and a form of society that aims to promote the wellbeing of all and preserve the ecological foundations of life. This requires a fundamental change in the world in which we live and a comprehensive cultural change.

The current economic and social guiding principle is "higher, faster, further" - it requires and encourages competition between all people. On the one hand, this leads to acceleration, excessive demands, and exclusion. On the other hand, economic activity destroys our natural foundations of life and the habitats of plants and animals. We are convinced that the common values of a post-growth society should be mindfulness, solidarity, and cooperation. Humanity must see itself as part of the planetary ecosystem. Only in this way can a self-determined life in dignity for all be made possible.

Bigger isn’t necessarily better. Things in nature grow to a certain point and then stop. They become full-grown adults, forests, or coral reefs. This doesn’t mean they’re dead. If anything, it’s the stability of adulthood that lets them become participating members of larger, mutually supportive networks. We know that nothing in nature can sustain an exponential rate of growth, but this doesn’t stop many of our leading economists and scientists from perpetuating this myth. They cherry-pick evidence that supports the endless acceleration of our markets and our technologies as if to confirm that growth based corporate capitalism is keeping us on track for the next stage of human evolution. To suggest we slow down, think, consider—or content our- selves with steady profits and incremental progress—is to cast oneself as an enemy of our civilization’s necessary acceleration forward. By the market’s logic, human intervention in the machine will only prevent it from growing us out of our current mess. In this read of the situation, corporations may be using extractive, scorched-earth tactics, but they are also our last best hope of solving the world’s biggest problems, such as hunger and disease. Questioning the proliferation of patented, genetically modified seeds or an upgraded arsenal of pesticides just impedes the necessary progress. Adherents of this worldview say that it’s already too late to go back. There are already too many people, too much damage, and too much dependence on energy. The only way out is through. Regulating a market just slows it down, preventing it from reaching the necessary level of turbulence for the “invisible hand” to do its work.

When it comes to the possibilities of 'learning from history' there are doubtless many things we could aspire to learn. Some of those would be more practically useful, in terms of contributing to the normal and decent functioning of well-meaning societies than others.

"We learn from history that we learn nothing from history."

George Bernard Shaw

Overwhelmed with the current status quo, we came up with short term thinking solutions. We see technology arises, but don’t see the bigger picture. Especially when we talk to scientists or people like Ray Kurzweil, we hear how often prosperity improves every year. They measure improvement as a function of life expectancy or reduction in the number of violent deaths. Those are great improvements on their own, but they give false cover for the crimes of modern capitalism—as if the relative peace and longevity enjoyed by some inhabitants of the West were proof of the superiority of its model and the unquestionable benefit of pursuing growth. Nevertheless, our society is becoming more and more divided and our well-being in the western world is steadily decreasing. Mr. Fuller already said 40 years ago how we can live in a society we would like to live in, if you are interested in that, message me. Don’t want to write a book here yet.

Statistically speaking, I do acknowledge the arguments, but they leave a lot to hide. We have modern slavery, toxic waste dumps, river pollution and global geopolitical disputes, all of which depend on the same system. So while we calm ourselves down with statistics, and adjust them to our imagination, we live in a world that is increasingly falling apart. Many problems that lead to the extinction of mankind, we have not addressed, cyber war, drone wars, killer bacteria, bio weapons, the eradication of other countries or the destruction of our Mother Earth.

Capitalism is not fair and it has not reduced violence, nor has it reduced many of the technologies that should now support us in our daily lives. We may get shot down less in the public streets, but that doesn't mean that the world has become any less violent or that the blind pursuit of permanent economic growth or technological progress has increased with the enhancement of human well-being. How are we going to tell a chief of a company or state that what he is doing is bad.

With the blessing of the economy we will continue, rather than reinvent ourselves, to go on the self-destructive way for another 5-10 years. So we make promises that the world will be better, we just have to be more advanced than before.

In the calculation of capitalism, we often forget ourselves, the human being. And now, in this calculation, we strive to simply dissolve it, to automate it. We want to overcome every potential obstacle to drive economic and technological growth as smoothly as before.

But we need models that do not strive for more, but for the one that best adopts to the environment or in the words of Mr. Taleb an antifragile economy.

ATTENTION, ATTENTION, HAPPINESS

How I complety changed my life and start becoming a happiness seeker?

Hi,

For some of us, the ultimate goal in life is happiness. Also for me, honestly who doesn´t want to be happy and free?

Whether we see fulfillment in our work, contentment in our relationships, passion for our hobbies … we strive to find happiness.

And yet, this search for happiness can be a lifelong search, especially if we look at happiness as something that will come once we achieve certain goals — a nice home, a perfect spouse, the ultimate promotion … and when we get these goals, instead of being happy, we often are looking forward to being happy when we meet our next goals.

Happiness shouldn’t be something that happens to us in the future, maybe someday, if things go well. Happiness should be here and now, who we are now, with the people we’re with now, doing the things we’re doing now. And if we’re not with people who make us happy, and doing things that make us happy … then we should take action to make that happen.

That’s the simple formula for happiness. Take action to do the things that make you happy, with the people who make you happy, and to be happy with the person you are now.

Don’t wait for happiness. Seize it.

We know many things that can help us to be happier. Be it: living in the moment, learning, sex, having fun, meeting friends, traveling. We all have certain things in our heads that help us to be happier. I cultivate it very simply. I have a list on which the following things are written:

Do

  • x

Stop doing

  • y

It's that simple, and every morning I look at this list and try to live the day after.

To be honest, I think the subject of happiness is very broad. All I want in my life is to transform the world into a desirable future. One of the most important building blocks for this is to end human suffering. One way that has helped me is meditation and being alone. I have written about that in my book as well, and really hope to publish it this year. Currently, it feels I need to escape this concept of society again and begin my “hero’s journey. Let me explain.

I love meditation, it’s simple but not easy. Meditation is essentially training our attention so that we can be more aware—not only of our own inner workings but also of what’s happening around us in the here and now. Once we see clearly what’s going on in the moment, we can then choose whether and how to act on what we’re seeing.

Meditation is the act of being alone. The act is entirely different from the activities of isolation. The very nature of the ‘me’, the self, the ego, is to isolate itself, through concentration, through various forms or methods of meditation, and through the daily activities of separation. But to be alone is not a withdrawal from the world. The world of man is gregarious; it is the interrelationship of influence, of opinion, and the weight of tradition. It is the entertainment of thought and the activity of self-absorption. This inevitably leads to loneliness and self-isolating misery.

To be alone is only possible when the mind is outside the influence of society; when inwardly there is freedom from the social disorder. This freedom is a virtue, and virtue is always alone; the morality of a society is the continuance of disorder. Meditation is transcending this disorder and is not the private pleasure of visions and expanding experiences. These experiences are ever isolating.

Love is not separative, and as love cannot be cultivated so aloneness is not a thing of thought. It comes as naturally as the sunrise when there is freedom from the activities of thought.

After all, it is becoming more and more difficult even to be physically alone. Most people don’t want to be alone; they are afraid to be alone; they are occupied, and they want to be occupied, from the moment they wake up until the moment they go to bed, and even then they are haunted by dreams. And those who live alone, in the caves or as the monks in their cells, are never alone, for they live with their images, their thoughts, and the practices which promise them future fulfillment. They are never alone; they are full of knowledge and full of the darkness of the cave or the cell.

One must really be an outsider, not belonging to anything or to anybody. But you cannot fight your way out, for then you still belong to it. The very act of fighting your way out is the action that makes society tick. And so there is neither outside nor inside. As soon as you are aware that you are outside, you are in. So you must die to society so that the new life comes into being without your knowing it. The new is not an experience; to know the new is to be the old. And so walk in solitude, though you live in society.

Are you willing to die to society, so that your new life comes into?

Sincerely,

Malte

PS: Have you ever heard that story a grandfather told his grandson:

“I have two wolves fighting in my heart. One wolf is vengeful, fearful, envious, resentful, deceitful. The other wolf is loving, compassionate, generous, truthful, and serene.” The grandson asks which wolf will win the fight.

The grandfather answers,

“The one I feed.”

What a narrative?

Maybe you remember the second Newsletter. I tried to explained what it will all about. And sometimes I have to explain myself again.

I will make people challenge their current beliefs about what is important in their lives and to accept a different way of looking at the world that creates harmony, happiness, and health. That’s easier said than done. I tremendously believe in the potential of the human species. Knowledge always wins in the end, but not unless and until it is known. This is a crucial point because it is hard as we are wired by believes that arent truth and we are missing out on a narrative that we can use to thrive. I am very happy to have people in my life who are much smarter than me and explain to me things I don´t understand that much, like cognitive Artificial Intelligence, Math or Energy (more on a spiritual level).

What can we trust? Why is the ‘information ecology’ so damaged, and what would it take to make it healthy? Some questions I have in mind today and not sure if I will write about them today or not, but sooner or later we will come back to them.

Most people have known me as a founder, tech guy and how to understand the world in systems. But these are just labels we attach to people to make sense of them. I always believed that technology is going to fix most of our problems. But after several years in this industry, I understand that first, we need to change our minds. I believe that humans are capable of extraordinary things in symbiosis with the earth. More than any other known species, we have a breathtaking ability to grow, create, explore, love, and solve challenges. We need to come together - which is in fact our natural state. I believe the solution to that world lies in raising human consciousness. Which means evolving the way people learn, grow, work, and co-create.

I see patterns that others sometimes miss, and I connect dots in a very unusual way. Let me answer your questions. We are all drowning in massive human beliefs. The current system was telling me and is still telling you how to eat, how to make money, and how to live. It creates benchmarks to measure us. You should be doing this. And you should be living like that. Go to that university. Most of the time we are told if you follow that path and you will be successful (whatever that means). But those are just narratives and stories we came up with. In our basic nature, we are humans and we should learn to live in symbiosis together. We are part of nature, but we act like we are different. I like to think that there is a difference between bending to life necessities and blindly accepting that you must live your life according to preconceived rules.

We know ourselves through stories, and we know each other through the stories we share. But for all the beauty of stories, we are drowning in them. This is, after all, the promise of postmodernism; the grand narratives that bound us together have been stripped away and instead, the world is fragmented into an infinity of individual perspectives, weaving into a tapestry so thick we can no longer see through it. Wherever we look now, either online or at our institutions and ideologies, we find no single story strong enough to bind us together.

Much Love,

Malte

Offtopic

PS: I am a lot into health and longevity, currently advising some people on nutrition and fasting (not an expert here). I am trying to avoid sugar and looking for cereal companies in Germany like Magic Spoon or other “healthy” snacks.

PSS: If you are interested in those things I can start a small Telegram Group on this as well.

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